Fertility Treatment Success Rates



Fertility treatments success rates are strongly related to the age group and the general health of the individual patient. Typically, pregnancy rates following IVF treatment decline as the female partner gets older when women are using their own eggs. This is mainly due to lower egg quality which leads to lower implantation rates and higher risk of miscarriage. On the other hand, healthy individuals are more likely to have a successful outcome. Many conditions such as diabetes, obesity, smoking, increased alcohol consumption may affect negatively a woman’s chances of becoming pregnant, even following IVF treatment.

The charts below demonstrate Newlife IVF Greece average success rates for IVF and Egg Donation treatment cycles performed in 2017. Our results are displayed in comparison to the most recently published national averages in the USA and the UK, provided by SART and HFEA respectively.

Note that the data presented in this report should not be used for comparing clinics. Clinics may have differences in patient selection, treatment approaches, and cycle reporting practices, which may inflate or lower pregnancy rates relative to another clinic.


Pregnancy rates (per embryo transfer) for patients receiving IVF treament using their own fresh eggs (%)


Age NEWLIFE 2017 SART 2015 Prel.[1] HFEA 2014[2]
18-34 77.8 66.7 43.7
35-37 62.5 61.6 38.7
38-39 70.0 53.2 30.3
40-42 42.8 42.3 21.3
42+ 22.9 23.6 11.3
54.2 49.5 29.1
All the above data are based on the latest publications of the above mentioned scientific societies (Review was made March 2018).
You can verify this data in the following links: [SART], [HFEA]
[1] Results in the US might be considerably increased due to the wide use of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS).
[2] Results in the UK might be negatively affected by the large number of elective single embryo transfers performed.

Pregnancy rate per frozen embryo transfer - non donor eggs (%)

Age NEWLIFE 2017 SART 2015 Prel.[1] HFEA 2014[2]
18-34 74.4 64.9 36.8
35-37 59.0 61.6 35.0
38-39 58.4 56.8 29.6
40-42 48.0 51.8 26.5
42+ 45.2 45.4 20.5
56.4 56.1 29.7
All the above data are based on the latest publications of the above mentioned scientific societies (Review was made March 2018).
You can verify this data in the following links: [SART], [HFEA]
[1] Results in the US are positively affected by the wide usage of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS).
[2] Results in the UK might be negatively affected by the large number of elective single embryo transfers performed.

Pregnancy rates (per embryo transfer)[1] for patients receiving IVF treatment using fresh donor eggs

Age NEWLIFE 2017 SART 2015 Prel.[2] HFEA 2013[3]
66.7 50.4 32.0
All the above data are based on the latest publications of the above mentioned scientific societies (Review was made March 2018).
You can verify this data in the following links: [SART], [HFEA]
[1] Results in the US and the UK refer to 'live births per embryo transfer' and not 'pregnancy rates per embryo transfer'.
[2] Results in the US might be considerably increased due to the wide use of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS).
[3] Results in the UK might be negatively affected by the large number of elective single embryo transfers performed.

Pregnancy rates (per embryo transfer)[1] for patients receiving IVF treatment using thawed embryos from donor eggs


Age NEWLIFE 2017 SART 2015 Prel.[2] HFEA[3]
62.3 39.5 N/A
All the above data are based on the latest publications of the above mentioned scientific societies (Review was made March 2018).
You can verify this data in the following links: [SART]
[1] Results in the US refer to 'live births per embryo transfer' and not 'pregnancy rates per embryo transfer'.
[2] Results in the US might be positively affected by the wide use of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS), while might be negatively affected due to the fact that many embryos arise from frozen donor eggs.
[3] HFEA does not publish results for this type of treatment